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Grayling

#41
Yes the Lower Itchen Fishery is full of grayling, and trout.
But you normally need to wade through 30 grayling of 4-12oz till you get one of 1and a half.

The roach seem harder to find. Few nice chub. Very swim specific. Barbel in the bottom end.

Expensive. I'd rather spend the extra £25 driving onto Wool/Wareham
 
#42
Quite right about LIF Graham, but that will often give you at least two chances of a pound plusser :D I'm with you on the Frome, a wonderful river, and if I lived a nearby I'd probably fish nowhere else for grayling.
 
#43
Cracking day on a Welsh river with about 80 grayling with at least half over the lb best probably short of 2lb.

3 spotties best about 3lb. Really enjoyable day.
 
#47
With the car covered in heavy frost yesterday morning the obvious thing to do was go grayling fishing. Spent the day on a small Dee tributary, the morning on a stretch Ive never fished before and had 28 with several going over a pound, plus 4 small brownies. After lunch I moved to a stretch that I do know well and added a further 18 grayling to a pound along with a few dace, chub, trout and salmon parr, great fishing from a water that is generally only 15-20' wide!
 
#48
Cracking day yesterday on the Wye up at Builth Wells. I do love how the landscape and Wye changes as you travel from Herefordshire through to Powys. Had around 60 fish in total split pretty evenly between trout and grayling. There is just something really special about wading out into the river and and trotting for grayling. Simple tactics for beautiful fish.
 
#49
Awesome just found this thread in time. Grayling is a species I've never fished for but taking my brother towards new year for his first trotting experience. Advice please on stretches to fish. He lives near Cheltenham so anywhere in that region would be ace thanks in advance Jon
P.s if other species are present all the better to
 
#50
Jon.
2 choices really to my knowledge.

Either head over the border to Cardiff area and the Taff

Or as H, head to Builth Wells.

Day tickets available at both venues and about 90 mins journey time for you.

There are other Southern options at greater distance but both of those will almost certainly give you fish unless well up and coloured.


I have done very well in both venues.
 
#53
Awesome thanks Graham are they via the Wye and usk foundation? I'm assuming you can fly fish to? Thanks Jon
BW. No unless you join fly membership for year. I think that is limited and full last time I looked.

Groe Park club. Very nice club and you can join coarse ticket or get tickets in town.
Maggs allowed WINTER.

Trot 3-4 red maggots under 3 -4 grm Avon size 14 red mag hook.

Feed 6 -10 mags a trot to keep them coming. Good chub as well in certain swims. Keep mobile and fish other bank to town side.
 
#54
this might cause some offence?

do any of you keep a few grayling for the 'pot'?

when i was in Scotland on the Tay they were so numerous i took a couple most trips as they are lovely to eat
 
#56
this might cause some offence?

do any of you keep a few grayling for the 'pot'?

when i was in Scotland on the Tay they were so numerous i took a couple most trips as they are lovely to eat
I've not taken a grayling for close to thirty years. I won't rule it out completely and have no issue with others taking them if they see fit. However, my perception is that numbers are dwindling and I can't justify taking them, no matter how nice they are to eat.
 
#57
Thanks gents currently out shopping in wet Exeter! I'll look things up when I'm home i really like the idea of other species such as chub to. My brother will just have to learn the art of trotting for the day. Going to have to put the layers on under the waders!!! Really looking forward to it
 
#58
Nick.
Never have. But wouldn't condemn anyone that wanted to.
they taste lovely - a very fine and delicate flavour

i suppose it goes back to the 'hunter' part of our evolution - eat what you catch?

i'm a meat eater and some years ago i felt is was necessary for me to see how our meat is killed - its easy when you see it in a supermarket or a butchers

since i was a kid i was brought up in the country and shot/stalked all kind of animal - and my father also taught me how to put an injured animal out of its misery and prepare it for the table

everything from a snipe to a red deer - and the odd squirrel (tasted like chicken) - i have butchered the lot and had no qualms

but i wanted to see where my beef/pork/lamb was slaughtered

chicken experience not needed as i worked in a chicken processing plant many, many years ago

so i went to a slaughterhouse - a very humane one owned by a family friend

i knew what to expect - but is was to say the least shocking and let me with a moral dilemma - eat farmed meat or not?

coward in me took the easy course of less meat

i would prefer to go into a field and kill a pig/sheep/cow with my .308 Win Mag - stress free killing

i know a person who farms American Bison for food in the UK - they are too big/dangerous to take to the slaughterhouse - so are shot in the field
 
#59
I've not taken a grayling for close to thirty years. I won't rule it out completely and have no issue with others taking them if they see fit. However, my perception is that numbers are dwindling and I can't justify taking them, no matter how nice they are to eat.
obviously if stocks are low then do not take for the table