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Four For A Quid Feeders

Clive Kenyon

Senior Member
Summer is coming and that means shops will be stocking BBQ items again. In particular BBQ mesh used to prevent meat from sticking to metal grills. In the past I have found them in Poundshops and Wilkos. The latest ones cost me €1.79 each and will make up to a dozen feeders dependent on size. I use roofing lead that can be obtained at scrap yards, but you can source flat lead on small rolls from the usual online outlets. The link is made from mono shock leader.

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You can cut and trim the mesh using scissors and because it is soft there is no chance of sharp edges like can occur with galvanised mesh feeders that haven't had the edges folded over

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You can make the feeders any size and attach a strip of lead that is folded over to trap the mesh using a four square overlap. Then align the mesh properly and attach the loop of mono to the other end of the lead strip before folding that over to trap the knot. Squeeze the folds of lead tightly using pliers to lock the mesh in place.

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The feeders can be stored flat and take up a lot less space in the tackle box. All six feeders shown above are in that one compartment and there is plenty of room for another 3 or 4. I used to add a tie wrap to stiffen them up, but in practise there is no need. The groundbait packed in is enough.

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When filling the feeders I make a small ball of compressed groundbait, push that inside and then squeeze it flatter to fill the space. Then add loose feed or soft groundbait before topping it off with another ball of compressed groundbait. The feeder will collapse as it empties and is less likely to become snagged on the bottom.

If it does snag then you can take comfort in knowing that it only cost around 25 pence.
 

Richard Isaacs

Senior Member & Supporter
I think they are great Clive but why not cut those tag ends flush before rolling your cage so they ain’t so sharp at the top and bottom
 

Clive Kenyon

Senior Member
Thsy aren't sharp. I covered that aspect in the post. The mesh is textile coated with plastic.
 

Richard Isaacs

Senior Member & Supporter
I know the stuff you mean. It’s not sharp like steel but I’d still cut em flush and make the edges smoother. There’s no extra cost or effort in doing so.
 

Clive Kenyon

Senior Member
The textile is similar to that of a birthday candle and it is coated in a soft latex like covering.

As for the no extra effort: it would of course take an extra cut on each side for absolutely no reason at all other than cosmetic value. It is going to get left on a river bed, not the Tate Gallery.
 

Richard Isaacs

Senior Member & Supporter
Like I said in the first post. They look great it was just a suggestion to slightly improve them that’s all.
They’ll be less likely to hang on to streamer weed or debris for example if they are smooth around the edges.
I Should of been clearer around the extra effort thing. I don’t mean going back and tidying them all up Now, I meant it was no extra cost and little extra effort to cut them along the line in the first place.
 

Clive Kenyon

Senior Member
Richard, you are imagining problems that don't exist. You started off implying that they have sharp edges, then admit that they don't and now they are suggested to be prone to collecting weed.

I suggest that you make some before commenting. Then you may discover that there are no issues with the finish.
 

Clive Kenyon

Senior Member
If someone makes and uses them I will take on board to what they say. But you are imagining issues that don't exist and contradicting yourself in the process. I have been using these for over ten years and only stopped using them when I couldn't find the grid here in France to replace the ones I had lost along the way. So I ended up making them out of galvanised mesh instead. IMO the plastic mesh feeders are better in every way than the galvanised metal ones.
 

Clive Kenyon

Senior Member
A response from a French angler on another forum is very interesting. He uses hair curlers as a base to make feeders. Some will remember using curlers before feeders were offered for sale, but these are better than the ones back in the day. They come covered in velcro, but once that is peeled off it leaves a strong plastic cage. I'm not a fan of the unnecessary swivel and tube attachment. I use a simple loop of shock leader that can be attached to a running link that incorperates a chod drop-off clip and swivel. But the curlers themselves look ideal. He gets them off ebay.

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Richard Isaacs

Senior Member & Supporter
They look a much nicer job. Can clearly see some care gone into the job there.
Swivels are not pointless they serve a purpose of of allowing your feeder to naturally rotate on cast or retrieve. It’s why they are pretty much attached to every hanging style lead and feeder around.
 

Clive Kenyon

Senior Member
They look a much nicer job. Can clearly see some care gone into the job there.
Swivels are not pointless they serve a purpose of of allowing your feeder to naturally rotate on cast or retrieve. It’s why they are pretty much attached to every hanging style lead and feeder around.
I have a swivel in the connection between main line and feeder. There is no need for another one. One swivel in the connection instead of one on each feeder. Simple and effective.

In any case when you consider that the lead on a feeder acts as a keel, the feeders in heavier sizes slide rather than roll and for the same reason they don't rotate during the cast or retrieve. Those feeders are 150g minimum. They won't roll or spin anywhere.

As far as I am concerned feeders are a disposable item in that they are usually lost before they wear out. The swivel and rubber tube are unnecessary regards efficiency, but add cost and time in manufacture. Those leads in the photo are purchased which adds to the cost without making them more efficient. I would much rather fish with an efficient feeder that does the job at the lowest price than pay extra for a work of art that is ultimately destined to lay forever on a river bed.
 

Graham Elliott

Senior Member & Supporter
The initial Thamesley feeders simply had a loop of stronger nylon and later wire.

Link swivel was opened up to lock the loop, with the eye end to run up the main line.
 

Terry Harman

Senior Member & Supporter
Thanks graham …seems like a load of faffing about to me rather use a feeder with a swivel on things move on … otherwise we would all be fishing with tank aerials and bent pins oh well each to they’re own I suppose
 

Clive Kenyon

Senior Member
So how is the feeder attached to the mainline / swivel?
There is a running swivel on the main line. That is attached to a sheaved chod clip which in turn is attached to a quick release clip that the feeder attaches to. This means that if the feeder becomes snagged the chod clip releases it, entailing that only the feeder and lower clip is lost, and everything else comes back.

If you don't fish snaggy places then a running link swivel suffices.

Either way, the swivel is in the link so you don't need one on every feeder. :)
 
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Terry Harman

Senior Member & Supporter
That’s got more components than Apollo 11….😳. so if the feeder becomes snagged you still lose the quick release clip …surely the cost of a quick release clip and a swivel is negligible
 
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Terry Harman

Senior Member & Supporter
Here’s my feeder 2 components……non snag……made in seconds……..
 

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Clive Kenyon

Senior Member
That’s got more components than Apollo 11….😳. so if the feeder becomes snagged you still lose the quick release clip …surely the cost of a quick release clip and a swivel is negligible
Four components. Add together the two components in your photo along with the linkage used to hold the lead that you haven't shown and we are about even.

One swivel on the line instead of one on each feeder. That is the point. The other components are there for a different purpose: to prevent a breakage of the mainline should the feeder become snagged.

And pva bags aren't feeders so I don't see the relevance of your point.
 

Graham Elliott

Senior Member & Supporter
Thanks graham …seems like a load of faffing about to me rather use a feeder with a swivel on things move on … otherwise we would all be fishing with tank aerials and bent pins oh well each to they’re own I suppose
Terry. I do use feeders with a swivel on. Korum or drennan flat maggot
Simply saying what the Thamsely feeders were like many years ago. Don't get too excited about it.
 
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