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Whats this i see in the bristol avon 😁

Andy Bebbington

Senior Member
dont know how to upload a video anyone help
 

Andy Bebbington

Senior Member
No not my video somewhere on the middle avon.
 

Tom Mycroft

Senior Member & Supporter
Derbyshire Wildlife Trust have now received their beaver license from Natural England and is one step closer to bringing beavers back to Derbyshire
In spring 2020 The Trust announced their plans and appeal to bring beavers back to Derbyshire and have been overjoyed at the positive response received. Due to the fantastic funds raised by our supporters, the £75,000 grant from Biffa Award and a total of £150,000 from Severn Trent, The Trust has been able to DOUBLE the size of the planned beaver enclosure at Willington from the 20 acres originally planned to now more than 40 hectares.

Natural England – the Government agency responsible for licensing the release and homing of the beavers - has reviewed and licensed the plans, and agreed that the Willington Area is large enough for two beaver families.

This is fantastic news for Derbyshire’s beavers but does that a lot of work is now underway preparing the much larger site. The Trust hopes that our two beaver families will be released in autumn this year.

This isn't just about the reintroduction of a species - it's about the reintroduction of an entire ecosystem that has been lost. Beavers are known as nature's engineers. They make changes to their habitats which create diverse wetlands for other species to thrive.

Kate Lemon, Regional Manager at Derbyshire Wildlife Trust said; “We are delighted to be one step closer to bringing beavers back to Derbyshire on our Willington Wetland reserve and cannot thank the generosity of the public, the support from Severn Trent and the Biffa Award enough. Bringing beavers back is a big step towards our vision of rewilding Derbyshire”

Rachel Maidment, Grants Manager for Biffa Award said; “Beavers and their landscaping behaviour benefits both people and wildlife. We're thrilled at Biffa Award to be able to support such an exciting project that is going to transform Willington Wetlands in the Trent Valley."

Graham Osborn, Principal Ecologist for Severn Trent, said: “It’s a really exciting time for this project, which we’re proud to support through our Great Big Nature Boost scheme.

“Looking after water means looking after nature too. That’s why we’re backing these plans to bring two beaver families back to Derbyshire. Their return to Willington Wetlands will bring many benefits for the local area, including the reduced risk of flooding, as well as capturing and cleaning nearby waterways.”

This site is next door to the Upper Trent. Won’t take them long to make that home!
 

Joe Winstanley

Senior Member
Derbyshire Wildlife Trust have now received their beaver license from Natural England and is one step closer to bringing beavers back to Derbyshire
In spring 2020 The Trust announced their plans and appeal to bring beavers back to Derbyshire and have been overjoyed at the positive response received. Due to the fantastic funds raised by our supporters, the £75,000 grant from Biffa Award and a total of £150,000 from Severn Trent, The Trust has been able to DOUBLE the size of the planned beaver enclosure at Willington from the 20 acres originally planned to now more than 40 hectares.

Natural England – the Government agency responsible for licensing the release and homing of the beavers - has reviewed and licensed the plans, and agreed that the Willington Area is large enough for two beaver families.

This is fantastic news for Derbyshire’s beavers but does that a lot of work is now underway preparing the much larger site. The Trust hopes that our two beaver families will be released in autumn this year.

This isn't just about the reintroduction of a species - it's about the reintroduction of an entire ecosystem that has been lost. Beavers are known as nature's engineers. They make changes to their habitats which create diverse wetlands for other species to thrive.

Kate Lemon, Regional Manager at Derbyshire Wildlife Trust said; “We are delighted to be one step closer to bringing beavers back to Derbyshire on our Willington Wetland reserve and cannot thank the generosity of the public, the support from Severn Trent and the Biffa Award enough. Bringing beavers back is a big step towards our vision of rewilding Derbyshire”

Rachel Maidment, Grants Manager for Biffa Award said; “Beavers and their landscaping behaviour benefits both people and wildlife. We're thrilled at Biffa Award to be able to support such an exciting project that is going to transform Willington Wetlands in the Trent Valley."

Graham Osborn, Principal Ecologist for Severn Trent, said: “It’s a really exciting time for this project, which we’re proud to support through our Great Big Nature Boost scheme.

“Looking after water means looking after nature too. That’s why we’re backing these plans to bring two beaver families back to Derbyshire. Their return to Willington Wetlands will bring many benefits for the local area, including the reduced risk of flooding, as well as capturing and cleaning nearby waterways.”

This site is next door to the Upper Trent. Won’t take them long to make that home!
I don’t think they like medium - big sized rivers Tom.
 

Neil Smart

Senior Member
They coppice small back streams and rivers. They create ponds that enable them to feed on vegetation in relative safety from predators. The thinking is that these ponds alleviate flooding further downstream, and there has been some significant improvements in habitat for many other forms of wildlife.

Not sure how viable the British countryside is in supporting Beaver, and I am sure the Otter had already marked their card.

Of course Beaver were a major reason why the U S A became into being, incredible creatures, they are the true meaning of furry friends.
 

David Clewer

Senior Member & Supporter
They coppice small back streams and rivers. They create ponds that enable them to feed on vegetation in relative safety from predators. The thinking is that these ponds alleviate flooding further downstream, and there has been some significant improvements in habitat for many other forms of wildlife.

Not sure how viable the British countryside is in supporting Beaver, and I am sure the Otter had already marked their card.

Of course Beaver were a major reason why the U S A became into being, incredible creatures, they are the true meaning of furry friends.
Neil,

Given that beavers were once native to this country, in what way do you think that our countryside may not be viable in supporting them? Is that because of the intensive farming, population growth, pollution or some other reason?


Dave
 

Neil Smart

Senior Member
Because of the very bodies that are charged with protecting our environment? However I hope they do establish themselves, and along with Graham I give them a big thumbs up. 👍
 

Neil Smart

Senior Member
Many years ago as a kid living in Bristol, there was a small stream running alongside our house. One day I noticed a large mammal on the bank, it was close enough for me to grab, I held it to the ground for a short while, and was not sure what it was before letting go. Thinking back I am pretty sure it was a Beaver, or perhaps a Coypu?
 

Simon Burt

Senior Member & Supporter
I suppose the issue with beavers in the BA might be whether or not the existing landuse around the river banks can cope with changes the beavers might cause to the floodplain. Much of the land along the BA is quite actively used for agriculture and residential etc and the course of the river is perceived to be fixed by the landowners; this may be tricky if beaver dams and the resulting ponds and more diverse channel forms encroach on existing human activity. However if they can be encouraged to occupy less pressured sections where the rural landuse is low intensity then they could be of great benefit - slowing down flows and helping to retain water for longer would be good for summer fishing water levels as well as reducing the likelihood of extensive flooding downstream. The ponds would become nursery areas for young fish and refuges for all during floods. I had heard that some had been seen on the Somerset Frome in the last few years, does anyone know where these came from? Were they deliberately introduced under permit or have they escaped or been placed on the sly? Be interesting to see what interactions between beavers and otters are like.
 

Chris Guy

Senior Member
Where on the BA is this and was/were it/they legally introduced? I'm not at all sure as to whether this is a positive.
When they became extinct our average rainfall would have certainly been considerably more than it is now and the pressure on the land from arable farming would've been commensurate to population of the time, which was about 4 million. Now the population of the UK is approximately 66 million.
Our rivers now are heavily abstracted from and the build-up of silt and algae is everywhere to be seen. How can damming a small river or stream, that is a shadow of it's former self be a positive? I'm intrigued. Maybe in the far west and up north where average rainfall is substantially higher than the south and east, there'd be little negative impact on the surrounding countryside and rivers.
 

Joe Winstanley

Senior Member
This program on Beavers is well worth watching. The interview with a River Tay angler at 23.30 particularly interesting.


I can also recommend Derek Gow's book 'Bringing Back the Beaver'. Factual and very entertainingly written. I'm off to look at a local beaver release trial later this week, it's a site I surveyed in-depth 14 years ago so should be interesting to note any changes which may have occurred.
 

Chris Cheshire

Senior Member
Otters, then beavers, sea eagles on the IOW, red kites the reintroduction of all of these once native species that have been either hunted into near extinction or have died out due to habitat changes.... maybe 20 years from now it'll be the barbel that will be worthy of being reintroduced? 😬😬
 

Chris Guy

Senior Member
Otters, then beavers, sea eagles on the IOW, red kites the reintroduction of all of these once native species that have been either hunted into near extinction or have died out due to habitat changes.... maybe 20 years from now it'll be the barbel that will be worthy of being reintroduced? 😬😬
Already in hand. 10's of thousands already gone into the Ouse and Ivel mate.
BTW, they (they who know no better) are already about to reintroduce pairs of white tailed sea eagles into Norfolk. These birds are from Poland.
 
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