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New Baitrunners

Mike Thompson

Senior Member
I would definitely recommend the 4000OC's. I got one this year and love it, the clutch is so smooth it gives you lots of confidence to put some pressure on when needed.
 

Terry Simner

Senior Member
Many thanks Richard, much appreciate the offer, and I'll bear that in mind. I just want something a bit bigger than 5010's, and with a bit more cranking power. But I don't want to lose any of the 'bullet proof-ness' of my 5010's etc etc. They have to be able to withstand being thrown up the bank when I've had a bad sesh 😂
 

Terry Simner

Senior Member
New rods, new reels..... Certainly treating yourself Terry!
Yep, there's no pockets in shrouds eh, and the Dow Jones has been very good to me 🤠. But I'm not sure I'll find anything better than my 5010's as I can't really fault them, even though they (or any of my other Shimmys) have never been serviced. ATM I'm leaning towards OC's maybe, esp as the Thunnus isn't readily available.
 

Richard Isaacs

Senior Member
4000d OC and thunnus are all smaller and lighter than a 5010. So they won’t appeal. If you want bigger than an old 5k your looking a new 6k. These are built to take pain and crank
 

Richard Isaacs

Senior Member
Orrrrrrr...... why not give what you have a fresh life. 5010’s are a great reel and will keep up with the modern stuff.
The clutches can be a bit hit and miss but it’s nothing a bit of preventative maintenance can’t sort out and get them singing like a canary.
a good strip, clean and full lubrication service and they could be like brand new reels again.
 

Rob Paylor

Senior Member
You guys using the D's & OC's...

After opinions on how you find the baitrunner tension adjustment of them as I find this a weakness (owner of a pair of 6000D and a pair of 8000D). Both sets I find I have the same 'issue'. For normal river conditions, ie. not crazy flow and not loads of debris, I can adjust the baitrunner tension so that the line does not pull from the spool whilst waiting for a bite, but the reel still retains a useful baitrunner function (ie line can pull freely from the spool on a take).

However, when I fish in high river conditions, and add in some debris, I'm finding that I have to have the baitrunner about as tight as it will go to prevent line being pulled from the spool. This renders the baitrunner about useless and means that a take will not be a 'free running line off the spool event', rather the rod would wrap round with me having to rely on preset clutch tension to ensure I didn't snap straight off.

Two different scenarios:

Sunday fished the Ouse at 12 feet above nsl, pulling through, 6oz feeders, debris coming down in abundance, baitrunner tension set as tight as I could get it so line wasn't pulling off the spool. To be fair, conditions were about as extreme as I can see myself fishing in.

Yesterday, Ouse about 4 feet up on nsl, strong flow but no debris, chucking 5oz feeder across about 40/50 yards into a deep channel, again had to have one of the baitrunners as tight as it would pretty much go or line was pulling from the spool.

I guess what i'm saying is that I find the baitrunner tension has lots of adjustability in the slacker end of the range, but I find at the tighter end it is either too free running, or too tight (almost pointless having it on). The adjustment through the range is not in my experience linear.

Due to both pairs being the same I don't believe this is fault with the reels, just how they are 🤷‍♂️

(Sorry for the thread hijack but lots of D's & OC's being mentioned!! 😅)
 

Rob Paylor

Senior Member
Rob, decent butt grips and the baitrunner should still release line on the take. Thought you were using them?
I am, but the adjustment range at the tighter end of the baitrunner tension just doesn't seem to be there. I'll show you next time we meet up bud. Pain in the arse at times!

edit - much to your disapproval, Daiwa reels seem to have better control on baitrunner tension 😂😂😂
 

Richard Isaacs

Senior Member
I am, but the adjustment range at the tighter end of the baitrunner tension just doesn't seem to be there. I'll show you next time we meet up bud. Pain in the arse at times!

edit - much to your disapproval, Daiwa reels seem to have better control on baitrunner tension 😂😂😂
Rob I have 4000 and 6000 D reels and I don’t find this a problem at all.
If the but of your rod is hard fixed as it should be with a free running system then the fish can still pull line from the spool even with the adjustment right up tight. I’ve had them rip line off mine on the rare occasions I turn it on at the tightest adjustment.
I think the answer to your problem isn’t in the reel but more where and how you present your cast. In conditions as you mentioned above I wouldn’t be entertaining a down stream cast for a start. I’d be casting upstream and find my lead can be sometimes half the weight of a down stream presented lead. Then I’d fish with at least a rod lengths worth of line taken off to present a bow or arc in the line.
This will catch the debris coming down but unlike a guitar string will take a lot more pressure before your lead is moved out of position.
Getting a bite fished this way pretty much renders a bait runner Completely pointless even if your sat with your head buried in the Sunday times.
The rod will dance back and forth between the fish creating slack line and the current taking it up.
if you leave it to the point where line is coming off the spool then you don’t belong on the bank. In more normal flowing conditions when a down stream cast is quite comfortable then a medium tension setting on the baitrunner is fine as you probably know.
 

Rob Weldon

Senior Member
I am, but the adjustment range at the tighter end of the baitrunner tension just doesn't seem to be there. I'll show you next time we meet up bud. Pain in the arse at times!

edit - much to your disapproval, Daiwa reels seem to have better control on baitrunner tension 😂😂😂
Simple answer.good butt grips forget the baitrunner,don't see the need for short sessions ever.
 

Paul Richardson

Senior Member
I only use baitrunners as an insurance against a rod getting pulled in and always have them as tight as possible as I’ve made the mistake of having them too free- running giving the fish more opportunities to get into snags.
I still use good butt grips and even snag ears but have still had hairy moments with violent takes on locked up rods where the bank stick has been pulled clean out of soft, sandy banks
This time of year with so many leaves in the water it can very frustrating to fish high spate rivers downstream
 

Rob Paylor

Senior Member
Just for the record, I was not fishing downstream! I was maybe casting upstream and ended up with the feeder downstream, but I was not casting straight out or downstream on either rod 😂😂😂
 

Paul Dowgill

Senior Member
I do not use the runner facility on my reel as I hold it as the rod can go flying in on the Wye but, and maybe i am being a bit thick, i would have thought that the bait runner when used always allows some line to be pulled off however tight as isn't that the point? However, runner off and tighten the clutch and that should not happen. As for water/debris pulling line off that is interesting and I wonder what pressure is being applied even with an upstream cast bow at 50 yards with 4" of extra water. If you watch Hadrian Whittle on the Wye feeder fishing I am sure he said that he has pulled up to 70 lengths (possibly 140') of line off his spool to ensure the feeder did not move. Did the line stop coming off at any point i.e. was balance achieved? Sounds like a trip to the park is needed to do some testing?
 

Gary Wagstaff

Senior Member
You guys using the D's & OC's...

After opinions on how you find the baitrunner tension adjustment of them as I find this a weakness (owner of a pair of 6000D and a pair of 8000D). Both sets I find I have the same 'issue'. For normal river conditions, ie. not crazy flow and not loads of debris, I can adjust the baitrunner tension so that the line does not pull from the spool whilst waiting for a bite, but the reel still retains a useful baitrunner function (ie line can pull freely from the spool on a take).

However, when I fish in high river conditions, and add in some debris, I'm finding that I have to have the baitrunner about as tight as it will go to prevent line being pulled from the spool. This renders the baitrunner about useless and means that a take will not be a 'free running line off the spool event', rather the rod would wrap round with me having to rely on preset clutch tension to ensure I didn't snap straight off.

Two different scenarios:

Sunday fished the Ouse at 12 feet above nsl, pulling through, 6oz feeders, debris coming down in abundance, baitrunner tension set as tight as I could get it so line wasn't pulling off the spool. To be fair, conditions were about as extreme as I can see myself fishing in.

Yesterday, Ouse about 4 feet up on nsl, strong flow but no debris, chucking 5oz feeder across about 40/50 yards into a deep channel, again had to have one of the baitrunners as tight as it would pretty much go or line was pulling from the spool.

I guess what i'm saying is that I find the baitrunner tension has lots of adjustability in the slacker end of the range, but I find at the tighter end it is either too free running, or too tight (almost pointless having it on). The adjustment through the range is not in my experience linear.

Due to both pairs being the same I don't believe this is fault with the reels, just how they are 🤷‍♂️

(Sorry for the thread hijack but lots of D's & OC's being mentioned!! 😅)
have to agree with you with what your saying with water on
 
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