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Propolis Fish Care

Mark Harridence

Senior Member
Came across this stuff, don't know whether anyone already uses it but looks really good. It's derived from bees, so is a natural product and antibiotic. It can be applied to any wound and forms an insoluble seal on contact with water. For £5.49 post free it's worth carrying a bottle around anyway but especially this time of year post spawning.
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Tim Harris

Active Member
Indeed, have been using it on carp for a few years. just dry the area to be treated, apply the propolis and then splash with water to seal it. seen some remarkable recoveries to wounds treated with this stuff.

The NT Labs version is very good - though presume the 'angling' versions are basically the same (though likely with anglers tax).

Its used for koi so you know it is likely to be good stuff!
 

Joe Winstanley

Senior Member
I'd be interested to know how many barbel anglers use antibacterial/antimicrobial treatments on their catches?

I have to admit that I've always been skeptical about effective they are, particularly when the fishery scientists I have asked has always been non-committal about their effectiveness. Having seen the way both carp and tench have the ability to remarkably heal some very nasty looking spawning damage come the following season it seems to me that the fish have their own highly effective natural healing processes which don't need tinkering with, and that as such these treatments aren't necessary on river fish and wild/lightly stocked stillwaters. Heavily stocked and/or pressured waters where the fish are regular visitors to the bank might be the exception though?

Still at least this product is a natural substance and everyone knows what it is and the fact it is completely water soluble...I don't know if things have changed, but I recall that Kryston wouldn't disclose any information on what was in Klin-ik. And don't get me started on the use of Bonjela...
 

Mark Swaby

Senior Member
The start of the 1997/98 season saw me fishing the Great Ouse at Ravenstone . On my second after work evening session I caught two doubles a big two tone at 14lb 4oz and a fish just over 10lb. The 10 lb fish was in a terrible state with big 2 inch ulcers,fin rot and fungus . I have never contemplated knocking a Barbel on the head before, but I did then, she was so bad. I gave her a chance and returned her carefully. She was caught almost every day for weeks, even on floating bread and became a mug fish for some time. I had caught the fish I wanted and so moved on to other sections. At the next Barbel society conference I met one of the Ravenstone anglers, he had caught his PB barbel in March 1998. He showed me the photo of an 11lb 12 oz barbel, 8 months on from my capture, it was the same fish. Healed from head to tail , the ulcers were replaced with dark scaleless skin, the fungus gone, the fins repairing. The fish looked rough and was never going to win any beauty contests but what an amazing natural recovery without any help. He said she fought well too. I carry a care kit due to club rules, but wonder how effective it really is.
 
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Jon Young

Senior Member
I'd be interested to know how many barbel anglers use antibacterial/antimicrobial treatments on their catches?

I have to admit that I've always been skeptical about effective they are, particularly when the fishery scientists I have asked has always been non-committal about their effectiveness. Having seen the way both carp and tench have the ability to remarkably heal some very nasty looking spawning damage come the following season it seems to me that the fish have their own highly effective natural healing processes which don't need tinkering with, and that as such these treatments aren't necessary on river fish and wild/lightly stocked stillwaters. Heavily stocked and/or pressured waters where the fish are regular visitors to the bank might be the exception though?

Still at least this product is a natural substance and everyone knows what it is and the fact it is completely water soluble...I don't know if things have changed, but I recall that Kryston wouldn't disclose any information on what was in Klin-ik. And don't get me started on the use of Bonjela...
Very true. We often catch fish that have had serious damage from predators In earlier life that have healed themselves up. I doubt they applied any ointments to themselves
 

Alex Warren

Senior Member
I always carry a bottle. However, like Joe and Mark, I’m not convinced by the effectiveness.

This stuff does look good though, as putting conventional products on some of the cormorant and otter wounds I’ve seen would be like offering a plaster to someone with a lopped off limb. Would these fish survive/die without my intervention? Who knows... As long it’s not causing harm, it’s worth a punt, right?

I’m going to get a bottle.
 

Edward Adcock

Senior Member
I get mine straight from a bee keeper. If you want to cure a sore throat quickly put a few drops on a sugar cube and let it dissolve in your mouth. It is an extremely powerful antiseptic but a very stubborn stain to remove.
 

Ash Gould

Senior Member
I get mine straight from a bee keeper. If you want to cure a sore throat quickly put a few drops on a sugar cube and let it dissolve in your mouth. It is an extremely powerful antiseptic but a very stubborn stain to remove.
Good idea about the beekeepers.

Its good to dab on any cuts or scrapes that you get whilst fishing too, keeps weils and other nasties out.

Propolis definitely works. Fish have amazing powers of healing and regeneration and propolis helps to speed it all up, imo.
 

Steve Banham

Senior Member
It's really good for my Koi if they receive any knocks or bumps from spawning,always got a couple of bottles in & carry one when i'm out fishing just in case.
 
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