• You need to be a registered member of Barbel Fishing World to post on these forums. Some of the forums are hidden from non-members. Please refer to the instructions on the ‘Register’ page for details of how to join the new incarnation of BFW...

Nash scope rods

Jeff Howe

Active Member
Ditto
i was wondering about the 9ft @2.25 for small rivers perhaps the 2.25 is better for fishing to snags
as opposed to the 1.75
Regards Jeff
 

Jameel Khan

Active Member
I use the 10ft 1.75 tc for my smaller river fishing and find it to be more than enough , meaning why the need for anything bigger , and more so if the roaming approach is your thing . I also have a 10ft 2.25 tc and do use it from time to time when the rivers are up . Both rods are coupled with the GT 400 reels that nash do and have to say i think they're great .
 

Terry Simner

Senior Member
I've never quite got this mantra of 'smaller river/shorter rod'. On fishing for barbel and chub I've found a much greater need for greater fish control near the net on smaller rivers...the smaller the river, the more the fish seek out near side snags when they're being played to the net. With shorter rods you will lose much of this control. Shorting the length of the rod you use may improve the accuracy of your casting, but if you simply want to reduce the amount of rod stuck out over the water, sit back.
 

Joe Winstanley

Senior Member
I must admit I do like using 11ft rods in certain situations, but I've always been puzzled by the 9-10ft rod craze.

7-9' rods are useful as a stalker/tree rod, but who needs more than one stalker rod? And why would you want to fish a matched pair or trio of 9 or 10' rods?

I can only conclude it is a rouse for the tackle manufacturers to convince a load of anglers to part with more cash.
 

Terry Simner

Senior Member
I must admit I do like using 11ft rods in certain situations, but I've always been puzzled by the 9-10ft rod craze.

7-9' rods are useful as a stalker/tree rod, but who needs more than one stalker rod? And why would you want to fish a matched pair or trio of 9 or 10' rods?

I can only conclude it is a rouse for the tackle manufacturers to convince a load of anglers to part with more cash.
Fashion I reckon Joe. Pure and simple 'follow the leader'.
 

Richard Isaacs

Senior Member
some of the backwaters I fish you would struggle with a shorter rod with the Bank side vegetation and reeds.
a longer rod allows you to reach right over and drop a bait in.
more importantly it also allows you to play a fish over the top and not through the middle of it.
there are certain swims that hinder my 11’s yet a 12 would more comfortably deal with them.
I would say the only real advantage to going that short would be if your fishing in a swim where your surrounded by low hanging branches and a longer rod simply can’t be raised otherwise they don’t bring much to the table at all.
 

William Taylor

Active Member
I have been looking at scopes, not for barbel as I don't really see the point, however I want to start targeting carp on a local canal and shorter rods would be an advantage when fishing on a towpath.

There are a few other cheaper options, Wychwood and Sonik do 9ft rods. I know the Scope range are popular, just trying to work out if they are overpriced. I wouldn't be buying a 'short' carp rod for anything other than canal carping.
 

Jameel Khan

Active Member
Clearly there is a down side to using a smaller rod , but in my opinion playing a fish is not one of them . I fish swims some may consider unfishable , being somewhat overgrown . But with a bit of time and effort prior to fishing i visit them and do just enough to get myself in there . I've fished this way for years now and find it to be very productive . Anything bigger than a 10ft rod would making under arm casting near impossible let alone anything else . Of course there are limitations using a smaller rod with bankside vegetation, but again playing a fish in my opinion is not one of them , purely down to skill and technique .
 

Richard Isaacs

Senior Member
Clearly there is a down side to using a smaller rod , but in my opinion playing a fish is not one of them . I fish swims some may consider unfishable , being somewhat overgrown . But with a bit of time and effort prior to fishing i visit them and do just enough to get myself in there . I've fished this way for years now and find it to be very productive . Anything bigger than a 10ft rod would making under arm casting near impossible let alone anything else . Of course there are limitations using a smaller rod with bankside vegetation, but again playing a fish in my opinion is not one of them , purely down to skill and technique .
There’s a swim on the ivel opposite the fairground storage in Biggleswade that was between two trees that merged together to make a low arch. So low you crawled through to get to the river.
Impossible to fish with a length of anything more than 6-7 foot
I used to climb the tree (big kid I know🤣) and with a good pair of Polaroid’s you could see some real beauty’s hanging around in there.
I often thought about a short telescopic spinning rod just for that swim but never actually did it as the problem was there was Probably only a 10% chance of landing a hooked fish in there. There was just no where to manipulate the rod and I didn’t like those odds.
 

Terry Harman

Senior Member
Ditto
i was wondering about the 9ft @2.25 for small rivers perhaps the 2.25 is better for fishing to snags
as opposed to the 1.75
Regards Jeff
If I was to use a 10ft rod I would get the free spirit 10’ creeper probably a better rod and £70 cheaper....no Nash tax.... like the £800 bivvy 😧😧
 

Jameel Khan

Active Member
Agreed mate something's are a little pricey , as with alot of fishing gear . And there so called top end bivvy , not only pricey , it's heavy and takes some time to put up . Am too a fan of Free Spirit, just had two custom builds made up for Trent . Not used them yet but do love them to bits .
 

Lee White

Senior Member
I have the sonic xtractors exellent little rods great for roaming i fish a 60 acre lake with only one entrance point and long grass and styles to navigate through bushes it just makes mobility so much easier and they fit in the carboot and are completely outof sight so you can leave in your car and go for a walk and not worrie
 

Peter Brownbill

Senior Member
I started of with a couple of 9foot dwarfs , Used them for carp on the canal, flicking solid bags around, never had a problem. Up graded to scopes in 10 foot, great rods ,love the ideaof compact fishing, maybe not for everyone and I got mine secondhand ,Don’t believe all you read about them there a quality rod .
 

Richard Parsons

Senior Member
Anything bigger than a 10ft rod would making under arm casting near impossible let alone anything else . Of course there are limitations using a smaller rod with bankside vegetation, but again playing a fish in my opinion is not one of them , purely down to skill and technique .
Right there - is one reason for using a shorter rod.

There are a couple of really tight swims on the river I fish that would make a shorter rod beneficial - not that I own one. I use an 11 footer.
 

Ady Brayshaw

Senior Member
I've two 10 foot Harrison's pike rods. At 10 foot they are primarily designed for bait fishing from boats, where at that length, it is an advantage. I've used them for fishing from the bank on the big reservoirs when I've a couple of boat days afterwards. No real difference in playing or casting for big pike on open reservoir, but personally I prefer the longer 12 foot length for barbel fishing on the big rivers (Trent Severn etc). I see 10 foot barbel rods as more of a hindrance than an advantage. But that's only my opinion. Each to their own.
 

Paul Collins

Senior Member
Got one of these for Salmon spinning recently and it would make a brilliant Carp or Barbel rod, if a short rod is needed.
Well finished, quality Japanese blank, Fuji Alconite rings. Soft tip and nice powerful butt. Only used 1and 2oz leads so far practising and I think it would chuck 3oz with ease
4 piece so easily hidden.
 

Stephen Crowhurst

Senior Member
So for a Barbel/Chub rod I want something long enough to clear bank side vegetation or keep line out the flow, tbh in either situation this is irrelevant as I can move the rod back or forth or use a longer bank stick, generally anyway. It’s really of little consequence.

When I spinning for Perch and pike though, short is king, generally. A long rod is not only unnecessary but it hinders me moving about from swim to swim with a set up rod. Too long and casting with and under arm flick is uncomfortable or even impossible.

We are of course talking completely different principles. One is throwing a couple of ounces of lead then sitting it in a rest for few hours, the other is throwing a few grams a dozen times then changing swims for a few hours. The only time I can see a dinky rod like the scope as useful is in hit and hold snag swims which the rod length is probably the least of concerns.
 
Top